We are excited to see the kids experimenting with the Everbright Wall Display, a networked array of LEDs, at Milpitas Library. The are kids having fun manipulating the 476 light dials on the light wall, to create different patterns by adjusting each of these RGB LED dials.

The Everbright Light Wall will be on display for several weeks at Milpitas Library before rotating to another one of the Santa Clara County Library District’s other eight libraries.

LED networked array

“This community interactive wall allows our patrons to create designs in every color of the rainbow, plus the hues in-between,” stated Nancy Howe, County Librarian. “As a library system based in Silicon Valley, we strive to bring the latest technology to our libraries. Everbright promotes fun, learning and imagination, allowing our patrons to explore their creativity.”

Voler designed the modules for Hero Design that sells them to museums, large companies and other public buildings.

Raspberry Pi Controls the Networked Array

Each of the 476 lights dials has 8 LEDs and its own processor. They are all networked together with high speed differential serial communication wires and controlled by software on a Raspberry Pi. A display consisting of thousands of these units has an equivalent frame rate of more than 30 frames per second, which allows real time video, turning a wall into a full motion video screen.

Cooling was a challenge but we did some creative thermal management, including adjusting input voltages and thermal sinking the heat of the LEDs.

The system required lots of testing. Here is one test we performed:

We hope the Everbright Light Wall will be coming to a library near you soon.

LED wall

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